PicsDesktop.com ® Inc. blog

Our fans can leave here comments, news, events etc.




  • Categories

  • Blogroll

  • 25
    Jul 2013
    Asuka Park
    Posted in tourism by mars at 10:13 am | Comments Off on Asuka Park

    Asuka was one of the Imperial capitals of Japan during the Asuka period (538 – 710 AD), which takes its name from this place. It is located in the present-day village of Asuka, Nara Prefecture.

    Archaeology projects continue to uncover relics from these ruins. Recent discoveries in the area include Wado coins, believed to be some of the oldest coins in Japan, and paintings in the Kitora and Takamatsuzuka Kofun, or tombs.

    The Ishibutai Kofun is also located in Asuka. On March 12, 2004, the discovery of the remains of a residence’s main building adjacent to the kofun was announced. It is likely that the residence belonged to Soga no Umako, who is believed to have been entombed in the kofun.

    Asuka

    Asuka can be reached from either Okadera Station or Asuka Station on the Kintetsu train line, or by car on Route 169.

    Park Asuka – a complex of ancient objects and structures, covering a huge area. Only officially he has five archaeological sites. However, it is clear that there is still much more simply have not explored. Especially because the park many homes and private area in Japan – something untouchable.

    The most famous sites and places of tourist excursions in the area is the so-called “tomb Ishibutai” (in the diagram at No. 9, two photos below). It is notable because it is the largest structure of its kind in Japan, and some of its stone blocks weigh 75 tons. Such structures, called kofun and / or tumulus, in Japan at least a few pieces, there are also analogues in China and Korea.

    Ishibutai is the burial place of one of the rulers in the 7th century AD. However, even the official history admits that there is in reality no one was buried.

    In addition to problems with transportation and installation of sufficient quality blocks of this weight is also a problem and processing of granite from which they are made (this requires a very strong and solid tool, whose presence at this time a very big issue.)
    Asuka2
    When Asuka was an imperial capital, various palaces were constructed for each monarch. As soon as one emperor died, the whole court moved to a newly constructed palace, since it was considered dangerous to remain in a place where a deceased monarch’s spirit might reside. Sometimes even during a single emperor’s reign, palaces were changed multiple times due to destruction by fire or ill omens. Since these palaces were entirely constructed from wood, none of them have survived, although some archaeological work in modern times has uncovered such remains as stone bases for pillars.

    Onino-setchin (“Devil’s Bowl”)

    It is considered an ancient tomb, and consists of two separate parts. The lower part of the tomb (manaita) has a length of about 4.5 meters, width – about 2.7 meters, height – about 1 meter. Located on a hill. The upper part (settin) has an inner width of about1, 5 meters, height – about 3 meters. Located near the hill on which the manaita. On the bottom plate (manaita) many depressions – traces of its attempts splitting wedge. It is believed that the board tried to split for the construction of the castle Takatori

    Asuka3

    According to legend, in this place lived a demon (they are), which lured travelers and eat. On the “cutting board” (manaita) It is made of, and in the “closet” (settin) just to relieve themselves.

    Plane “bowl” (settin) from two different sides are not the same – the difference is in terms of five centimeters. It seems that the reconstruction of the original object in the form of a dolmen-birdhouse is true (also seen on the platform of the differing levels of both sides).

    The only neponyatka – how and why someone pulled the top of the 20 meters before the start of the slope of the hill, and as she swept up with the current situation – another 20 meters to the side).

    Asuka4


    You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

    Comments are closed.